Archive for the ‘ VMware ESX ’ Category

VMware Horizon (With View): Install, Configure, Manage [V6.0] – Jan 4 – 7 2016

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At TransUnion Interactive, we offer each associate a desktop virtual machine.  We use VMware Horizon View for this.  I am the primary system administrator responsible for our Horizon infrastructure.  Another team deals with the details of desktop support.  I recently had the opportunity to sit for the VMware training for Horizon, and here are a few notes about that class.

 

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I passed the VMware Certified Professional 5 – Data Center Virtualization (VCP5-DCV) exam!

I took the VCP550 exam for VCP5-DCV on 26 Feb 2015 and passed!  Here’s my thoughts on the test and how I prepared for it.

 

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Next SLO VMware User’s Group Meeting is Dec 7th, 2012!

Our next meeting is Friday, December 7th, 2012 from 10:15 AM to 2:30 PM at San Luis Obispo City-County Library,  Library Community Room, 995 Palm Street San Luis Obispo, CA 93401.

We’re basically going to talk about backup and recovery.  VMware will be presenting on some of their features like vSphere High Availability and the new vSphere Storage ApplianceVeeam Software will present on their backup solutions and provide lunch.

Anyone withing driving range of San Luis Obispo is welcome to come.  This is a great opportunity to come together with your fellow VMware users to discuss virtualization trends, best practices, and the latest technology!

For more information, and to register for the event, click here.  Registration closes Dec 6th, so hurry!

While you’re at it, visit the SLO VMUG web site.

VMware Online Training

I recently attended VMware vSphere: What’s New [V5.0] class from VMware.  Normally I prefer to go to instructor led training.  This time, because of tight budgets and schedules, I elected to attend a Live Online class.  It wasn’t bad!  Read more to see what an online class from VMware is like… Read more

Come to the SLO VMware User Group!

vmug_logoI’m helping start a local San Luis Obispo VMware User Group.  Anyone withing driving range of San Luis Obispo is welcome to come.  This is a great opportunity to come together with your fellow VMware users to discuss virtualization trends, best practices, and the latest technology!

The first meeting is Wednesday, November 9, 2011 from 10 AM to 2 PM at San Luis Obispo City-County Library,  Library Community Room, 995 Palm Street San Luis Obispo, CA 93401.  VMware is buying lunch, and we’ll discuss highlights of VMworld 2011.

For more information, and to register for the event, click here.

In the future, we are standing up a SLO VMUG web site.  There’s not much there (yet), but we hope to get some content posted this weekend.

The best part of VMworld was…

The best part of VMworld 2011 was THE LABS!!!

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How do you have a 500 seat lab operating 0800-2000 daily with NO PC’s OR SERVERS in a back room?  The cloud.

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Growing a Disk is *ALWAYS* a Bad Idea if You Have Snapshots

Never grow a disk if the machine has snapshots.  Even if the GUI lets you.

This morning I got a request to grow a virtual disk on a vm.  What you should do is look at the machine and see if it has any snapshots.  If it does, then you should delete them before attempting any disk grow operations.  In fact, what should happen is is if you try it, the GUI will give you an error stating that the “machine has snapshots, grow is not allowed”.  I was going too fast (and didn’t have enough coffee) and tried growing it with the machine on.  It failed.  I didn’t check for snapshots, I just turned the machine off.  Then I grew the disk.  It allowed me to do this.  (Really, the GUI should have refused to do this.)  This did *NOT* do what I expected…

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Be Careful When Putting an VMware ESX Host in Maintenance Mode With A vCLI Script

If your VMware ESX hosts are like our ESX hosts, the hosts are in clusters and you have Distributed Resource Scheduling (DRS) enabled.  So in the vCenter GUI, when you right click a host and select “Enter Maintenance Mode”, DRS evacuates all running virtual machines to other hosts in the cluster.

I’m learning more about scripting actions like this with the vSphere Command-Line Interface (vCLI).

Specifically, the book says that the vCLI command “vicfg-hostops –operation enter” (“Entering and Exiting Maintenance Mode with vicfg-hostops”, page 28) does exactly the same thing.  In fact that page in the manual says “If VMware DRS is in use, virtual machines that are running on a host that enters maintenance mode are migrated to another host automatically.”

This is *NOT* true.  When you run this command, runnings vm’s are SUSPENDED, not migrated.

As far as I can tell, I’m doing everything correctly.  Others have seen the same thing.

I’m not sure if it’s a “feature” or what, but be careful.  Telling a host to enter maintenance mode with a vCLI script may not migrate running machines.

(If it matters, I’m running ESX 4.1, Update 1.)

A Brief Overview of VMware vStorage API for Array Integration (VAAI) and Why You Should Care

VMware vSphere version 4.1 introduced various new features, including vStorage API for Array Integration (VAAI).  If you are using storage that supports VAAI (and most storage vendors are implementing it over time) then you can offload some storage intensive tasks to the storage array, and the ESX hosts are freed up to do other tasks.  What this means is that for certain kinds of tasks like making a new disk for a virtual machine (vm) that needs to be zeroed out, copying a vm, cloning a vm, etc., these operations will be much faster and the ESX hosts will be much less busy.

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Use Storage vMotion to Properly Rename a Virtual Machine’s Datastore

I’ve been a VMware administrator for a while now, but a co-worked recently showed me this handy trick.  This assumes that you can do a Storage vMotion, This requires you to have the right version of vSphere, like Enterprise or Enterprise Plus. (Well, not exactly…  As Joe points out below, if you turn the machine off or suspend it first, you can do this with Standard as well.)

In vCenter, you can easily rename a virtual machine.  You just right click on the machine and pick “Rename”.  Every virtual machine consists of a folder and files in a datastore.  Unfortunately, right click, Rename does not change the actual names of any of the files or folders.  So if you use rename every now and then, and you have lots of virtual machines, you can easily get into a situation where there are lots of datastores with lots of virtual machine files and folders that don’t match the name of any known machine.  Confusing!  Read more to see the fix… Read more